Ramekin is thought to come from a Dutch word for "toast" or the German for "little cream."




Name

Ramekin

Variant

Ramequin, Ramekin dish.

Pronounced

(ramə kin)[RAM-ih-kihn]ræməkin

Function

English Noun

Plural

Ramekins

Hypernym

A type of dish

Purpose

Cooking

Etymology

French Ramequin from Low German ramken, diminutive of cream, circa 1706. middle Dutch rammeken (cheese dish) dialect variant of rom (cream), similar to old English ream and German rahm. Ancient French cookbooks refer to ramekins as being garnished fried bread.


Meaning

1. A food mixture, (casserole) specifically a preparation of cheese, especially with breadcrumbs and/or eggs or unsweetened pastry baked on a mould or shell.

2. With a typical volume of 50-250 ml (2-8 oz), it is a small fireproof glass or earthenware individual dish similar in size and shape to a cup, or mould used for cooking or baking and serving sweet or savoury foods.

3. Formerly the name given to toasted cheese; now tarts filled with cream cheese.

4. A young child usually between the ages of 3 months and 11 years exhibiting a compulsion to force or "ram" their head into various objects and structures.

These days, a ramekin is generally regarded as a small single serve heatproof serving bowl used in the preparation or serving of various food dishes, designed to be put into hot ovens and to withstand high temperatures. They were originally made of ceramics but have also been made of glass or porcelain, commonly in a round shape with an angled exterior ridged surface. Ramekins have more lately been standardized to a size with a typical volume of 50-250 ml (2-8 ounce) and are now used for serving a variety of sweet and savoury foods, both entrée and desert.

They are also an attractive addition to the table for serving nuts,dips and other snacks. Because they are designed to hold a serving for just one person, they are usually sold in sets of four, six, or eight. Ramekins now are solid white, round, with a fluted texture covering the outside, and a small lip. Please bear in mind that whatever you ask for them on Internet auction sites, someone is still getting the same thing in an op shop for peanuts.

However, there are hundreds of decorative ramekins that came in a variety of shapes and sizes. They came in countless colours and finishes and many were made by our leading artists and ceramicists. My collection has ramekins with One handle only, fixed to the body at one point only. If it has no handle, it is a bowl. If it has two, it is a casserole dish. But the glory day of the Australian Studio Art ramekin is well and truly over. See some here, ask questions or leave answers.

P.S. Remember, just as real men don't eat quiche, real ramekins don't have lids or two handles. Also remember, two handles makes it a casserole dish. Also, please note If it aint got a handle, it's just a bowl.

P.P.S. To all you cretins who advertise your ramekins by associating them with "Eames" or "Eames Era". Get your hand off it, you are not kidding anyone. The Eames people have told me that they never made ramekins.

P.P.P.s To all the illiterates out there in cyberspace, just as there is no "I" in team, there is no "G" in Ramekin. I am the Rameking, they are ramekins.

If you have a set of Grandma's ramekins at the back of a kitchen cupboard, have a look through the site, maybe you will identify them. Thank-you for looking.

There are many of you out there that have knowledge of Australian pottery. Please let me know if you have anything that I can add to the notes. It is important to get the information recorded. You probably know something that nobody else does.

Please note that while your comments are most welcome, any that contain a link to another site will no longer be published.

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Sunday, September 29, 2013

Luke Nguyen







Designer        
Not Known
Maker
Made for Luke Nguyen by Baccarat
Marks
No marks on ramekins.  Name “Luke Nguyen” printed on bottom right-hand corner of platter; initials “LG” to left hand corner.
Material
Ramekins; Soft paste porcelain, 22ct gold to handle and exterior, Platter is laminated bamboo.
Description
Gilded bowl with white gloss glazed interior slightly indented footring base dimpled inwards from footring.
Condition
Good, some wear to gilding on footring
Number
No number
Production Date
Early 2000s
Width at rim
60mm
Width at base
40mm
Depth
23mm
Length (with handle)
97mm
Weight
90 gm
Volume
35 mm
Acquisition
Purchase
Salvo Stores, Noble Park
30th September 2013
Rameking Reference Number
LNG 001-004

These four little ramekins form a tasting sampler platter.  These platters are used in some restaurants for patrons to try various dishes.  These were made for Australian restaurateur Luke Nguyen by Baccarat cookware, a brand of Playgroup Pty Ltd located in St Kilda Road, Melbourne.  Tasting samplers are made for other purposes, such as for holding small glasses of different beers.

Luke is an award winning Sydney Restaurateur and Chef (at the “Red Lantern” restaurant in Surrey Hills).  He is also an author of several books on cooking and has hosted a television series on Vietnam and its food.  Luke was born in a refugee camp in Thailand in 1978 to Vietnamese parents who had fled the country some months earlier.  He has also apperared as a guest chef on the television show Masterchef, season 2., and “Masterchef Vietnam”.  He also takes tour groups to Vietnam to experience their cuisine and learn to cook it.  In partnership, he founded the “Little Lantern Foundation” giving disadvantaged youth training in the hospitality industry.



Lustre Gold ramekins like these are press-moulded soft paste porcelain with 22 Carat gold applied to the exterior of the bowl.  Gilding, as it is known, on pottery is a complex and difficult method to learn and can be done using several differing methods.  Over five tonnes of gold are still used each year to gild ceramics.  Gold can be sprayed, brushed, screen-printed, acid etched or mixed with resin.  Early methods involved mixing the gold with mercury or honey giving the body a bright rich honey gold colour when fired at a relatively low temperature.  Ancient gilding on the wood of Egyptian mummy cases is still as bright as original. 

The method most used commonly for lining ceramics with gold is to mix gold powder and borax (borosilicate or a bismuth based flux).  The resulting powder is brushed onto the pottery with a very fine brush (usually camel hair).  When the mixture dries, because it is mixed with water it is fired, during which the borax is burnt off and the gold melts into the body.  The pottery comes out brown and must be burnished (polished) with a stone, usually agate to bring out the gold colour. 

Any further information would be appreciated. maybe Luke can get in touch?

One of the things that I have often lamented on this blog has been the loss of industry as a result of Government policy and imports.  In the case of Royal Worcester, had it not been for the collapse of the glove making industry in Worcester in the mid 18th Century, Royal Worcester would not have come into being.  A number of local businessmen got together and decided to start a pottery.
One of the things that I have often lamented on this blog has been the loss of industry as a result of Government policy and imports.  In the case of Royal Worcester, had it not been for the collapse of the glove making industry in Worcester in the mid 18th Century, Royal Worcester would not have come into being.  A number of local businessmen got together and decided to start a pottery.
One of the things that I have often lamented on this blog has been the loss of industry as a result of Government policy and imports.  In the case of Royal Worcester, had it not been for the collapse of the glove making industry in Worcester in the mid 18th Century, Royal Worcester would not have come into being.  A number of local businessmen got together and decided to start a pottery.
One of the things that I have often lamented on this blog has been the loss of industry as a result of Government policy and imports.  In the case of Royal Worcester, had it not been for the collapse of the glove making industry in Worcester in the mid 18th Century, Royal Worcester would not have come into being.  A number of local businessmen got together and decided to start a pottery.







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